OPAL Tree Health Survey

Person Author: Helene Coleman Calender May 9, 2013 Posted Tags: , , Comment 1 Comment

A slightly different blog from me today…..In my day job, I’m lucky enough to work for a project called the Open Air Laboratories (OPAL) project which is run by the Natural History Museum and Imperial College London.

OPAL is a ‘citizen science’ project, which aims to get people outdoors and involved in scientific research. So this got me thinking that OPAL might be a project that the keen gardeners of Seed Parade might be interested in getting involved with!

We launched our national tree health survey today and this runs from May to September when trees are in leaf. As trees are so important for bringing nature into urban areas and providing food and habitats for wildlife, I thought this might appeal to my fellow gardeners out there!

The survey takes about 30 minutes to complete and involves a couple of simple activities like identifying trees, measuring their girth and height, examining the trunk, branches and leaves for signs of poor health and recording the presence of pests and diseases.

OPAL hope that the survey will help scientists to build up a picture of the health of Britain’s most common trees. Reporting any pests or diseases will also help scientists to understand their distribution, how they interact together, and how their impact varies from one year to the next.

If you’d like to find out more about the survey or would like to take part, then have a look at the OPAL website

That’s it for me for now, back to gardening next time, I promise!

 

One Response to “OPAL Tree Health Survey”

  • karen someoneorother:

    I cannot get out to measure trees etc due to disability but I can tell you that by the time all the sick trees in my part of Cambridgeshire have died there won’t be many left,oaks and ashes are suffering dreadful die-back and other trees seem to have suffered too over the last few years.

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