Posts Tagged ‘garlic’

How I grew over half a tonne of Veg on my allotment in 2013.. (Super-Blog part 2)

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So to continue... Spring Onions... As I said in the part 1 we love our onions.  As well as the normal onions I also have a small bed of multiplying onions - like a spring onion but a bit smaller. I originally planted a few bunches of two or three onions and they soon turned into huge bunches of tall tasty onions which are ideal in stews and soups. They have a totally different taste to normal onions. I dig up a portion of a bunch when required by driving a spade through the bunch and replacing some soil to fill the void!! When the whole bunch has been used I replant a small bunch of 2-5 and in not time they will be ready for eating as well. This way one only needs a square meter or so in the garden for theses.  They over-winter without any problem and jump back into growing mode i

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How I grew over half a tonne of Veg on my allotment in 2013.. (Super-Blog part 1)

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Wow - I was quite astounded when I added the quantities of veg that I grew on my allotment last season.. I grew 588 kg. on 165 sq. mt.   My Harvest 2013 After seeing the price of runner beans in town I decided to do a harvest record just to see how much I have grown and priced at supermarket prices.. Some estimates are on the lower side!! Strawberries 40kg = 88punnet @ £2.50 = £225 Broadbeans 6kg @ £1.80 per kg = £11 Peas 6kg @ £2 = £12 Potatoes 90kg @ £1 = £90 Gemsquash 130 @ 50p = £65 Runner beans 31kg @ 6.67 = £207 Courgettes 20kg @ £1.60 = £32 Squashes loads +/- 12 @ £1 = £12 Hubbard squash 4 large @ £4 = £16 Acorn squash 21 @ £1 + £21 Pumpkin 1 @ 2kg @ £2 = £2 Beetroot +/- 25 kg @ £3.3 = £83 Garlic 80 large bulbs @ 50p = £40 Onions 450 @ 2

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Early June Garden.

Person Author: Helen Fowler Calender June 9, 2013 Posted Tags: , , , , Comment 1 Comment
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Hard to believe we are in June now. The good weather we have had over the last couple of weeks has really made a difference. Everything is growing so fast, I can hardly keep up with the potting up, tying in and pinching out! I have baby tomatoes set on some of the early plants, young peas and broad beans and flowers on my chilli's. My bush tomatoes were planted out in pots and tubs outside last week and are looking good with lots of flowers. The bed and borders are full and lush, with little spare space for any new plants, but as I have grown oriental poppies, helebores and himalayan cowslips from seed, I will have to find room somewhere! The soft fruit is looking great and there is a good set on the currants and blueberries. My garlic that was planted in October is gro

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May Day or Beltane.

Person Author: Helen Fowler Calender May 1, 2013 Posted Tags: , , , , , Comment No Comments
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I cant believe that May is here already! Today is May Day or the pagan celebration of Beltane. Traditionally a May Queen was selected to honour the fertility of Mother Earth and the day was celebrated with much meriment including dancing round the May Pole. Well although there is no May blossom here or any dancing round any May Poles, I have been busy in the garden. Just a few weeks ago I was starting to feel a bit discouraged, looking around the garden thinking how awful everything looked. The lawn was pale and sparse, no sign of any buds or blossom on the fruit trees and the soil was cold and wet. Well, what a difference a few weeks of milder, sunny weather makes! The plants and trees in the garden have sprung into growth, the soil has dried and warmed up, even the lawn, which had

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Planting Garlic started off in pots

Person Author: Gavin Conway Calender December 30, 2012 Posted Tags: , Comment No Comments
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I never seem to be ready for planting my garlic directly in the plot in Oct / Nov each year so I start them in pots. Then when they have sprouted and started growing and the plot is ready I then plant them out (weather permitting). It is probably best to sow directly so you don't disturb when planting out but if one's plot is not ready there is no choice but to start them off in pots. Pics showing my tiny new bulbils with two normal cloves, last year bulbils and cloves ready for planting into pots in October.              I always keep some of the biggest cloves for planting out before I make garlic oil or freeze the rest. I also buy or scrounge named varieties on occasions. People say they also plant supermarket garlic - this is ok if its English grown but not if it's fro

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Growing Garlic.

Person Author: Helen Fowler Calender October 6, 2012 Posted Tags: , Comment 2 Comments
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Garlic has a long history of human cultivation of more than 7,000 years, and was well know to the Ancient Egyptians. It is a native of central Asia and has long been established in the Mediterranean. It's popularity has spread across the world. Garlic came to Britain with the Romans and has always been cultivated here. Garlic's big rise in popularity here, began when we Brits started to travel abroad on package tours. On returning home, folks wanted to recreate the wonderful tastes and flavours of the holiday. Then grew the trend for a 'take-away' resulting in a big rise in the number of Italian, Chinese and Indian restaurants and take-away's and garlic was here to stay. It is now a kitchen staple in most British homes. Garlic is part of the Allium family, along with leeks, onions and c

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Garlic rust

Person Author: Lajos Szabo Calender June 16, 2012 Posted Tags: , Comment 2 Comments
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What is rust Rust on plants is a fungal disease and it is not easy to control in humid weather as this helps the rust to spread easily. This year it seems to be a big problem on garlic. The weather was and still is just perfect for the rust to develop, rainy humid conditions and low light is the friend of the rust. Depends on when you planted your garlic you might or might not be able to save your bulbs. Generally autumn plantings are not affected too much or even if they do get rust you can cut off the infected leaves and wait a week or so more and harvest your crop, as normally by the time the rust strikes the bulbs in the ground are ready to pick. This year the wet and cold weather played a big advantage for the rust and the weaker young plants are more likely to get this disease. So

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