Archive for the ‘Flower Gardening’ Category

Sowing Hardy Annuals in Autumn.

Person Author: Helen Fowler Calender August 11, 2012 Posted Tags: , Comment 1 Comment

By sowing hardy annual flower seeds in autumn, the flowers develop a bigger root system than plants sown in spring. A bigger root system means lots more flowers. You can either sow these flower seeds direct into the ground, or sow in modules for planting out in late Autumn if the weather is mild, or overwinter in a coldframe or cold greenhouse for planting in spring. Some hardy annuals do better if sown in modules and overwintered undercover or with the protection of fleece. Direct Sowings of flowers: Prepare your soil to a fine tilth, then draw drills about a foot apart in the soil and sow the flower seeds into these lines. This shows you which are your flower seedlings and which are weeds. Flower seeds should be sown fairly thinly and when seedlings are large enough to handle, thin to

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Growing Hydrangea

Person Author: Lajos Szabo Calender July 28, 2012 Posted Tags: , , Comment No Comments
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Hydrangeas are native to southern and eastern Asia and America. Hydrangeas thrive this year as they enjoy all the rain and cooler temperatures. There are so many different species, subspecies and cultivars available today that even experienced horticulturalist could not say the exact number. Most varieties are from the species Hydrangea macrophylla, paniculata and quercifolia. The most well know hydrangeas are the mopheads, which change colour on different pH soil and have a full, mop like flower head. Lacecaps have two types of flowers, big sterile flowers surrounding small fertile florets. Cultivation They grow well in most type of soil, although I found that heavy clay will affect their growing in a negative way. They are the happiest on fertile, well drained soil. Hydrangeas

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Easy Perennial and Biennial Flowers from Seed

Person Author: Helen Fowler Calender June 22, 2012 Posted Tags: , , , , , , Comment 1 Comment

We are nearly in the last week of June and this is a great time to sow seeds of perennial and biennial flowers. If your not sure of the difference between perennial and biennial, here is the answer. Perennial means that the plant grows in it's first year,  [ sometimes even flowering ] then lives for a number years, flowering each year. They often shrink down to a low clump that lies sleeping over the winter, then grows up again each spring. Some flowers like Aquilegia, may only last a few years, others like Oriental Poppies and Delphiniums can last for decades. Biennial means the plant grows in it's first year, putting on leaves and green growth, then flowering in it's second year, setting seed, then dying. They can sometimes be encouraged to grow for another year if the flower spik

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Incredible Edible Flowers

Person Author: Helen Fowler Calender June 8, 2012 Posted Tags: , , , , , Comment No Comments
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Summer is the time for salads, iced drinks and lots of cakes and deserts. All of these can be made even more special with edible Flowers. A colourful mixed salad looks great, but add blue Borage flowers, orange Calendula petals and a scattering of pink Rose petals, and you have a stunning dish. Why not colour cordinate, halved red cherry tomatoes, thinly sliced red onion with red Monada flowers and Red rose petals, dress with a balsamic dressing, magic! Or, Sungold toms, orange sweet peppers with orange Calendula petals garnished with purple Violets or Violas would look amazing. A more spicy salad or vegetable dish can be enhanced with a mix of herb flowers, the combinations are endless. Small flowers and petals look wonderful on top of cup cakes and flower petals can be add

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Growing and Sowing Sweet Peas

Person Author: Lajos Szabo Calender February 25, 2010 Posted Tags: , , Comment No Comments
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Sweet peas are as popular as ever, and nowadays a wide range available, both old fashioned heirloom varieties and modern, long stemmed cut flower varieties too. Most of the flowers are highly scented and have a long flowering period, especially if taken care of (will expand on that a little later). Sowing: Many experienced gardeners sow the sweet pea seeds in the autumn (September-November) into a cold frame/unheated greenhouse and then plant them out later in the spring when the soil warms up a bit. This is not advised in the North of the country though. You better off sowing the sweet pea seeds in the spring, in March and then plant them out to their final position when the seedlings are 5-7 inches tall. The sweet pea seeds have hard coats. To aid the germination the seeds can b

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Lathyrus latifolius Everlasting Sweet Pea

Person Author: Lajos Szabo Calender February 18, 2010 Posted Tags: , , Comment No Comments

L. latifolius is the well know perennial sweet pea. Native to Central an Southern Europe and can be found in Japan and in North America where it is an introduced flower. Once it was widely grown in many English garden. Despite its lack of scent it is getting more and more popular again among keen gardeners. The mixture of seeds available are produce white, pink and purple flowers, wich makes a stunning display and give a year after year enjoyment. The plant is a climber, so best to grow on trellis, on a south facing wall, or you can try to grow them in hanging basket for a cascading effect. Easily grown in any type of soil, but thrives in a well drained rich and warm soil. Prefers a sunny location, perhaps near to your patio where you can enjoy the beautiful flowers all summer long.

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